Tag Archives: La Nina

The Polar Vortex Isn’t Going Away

I’d like to nominate polar vortex as Meteorological Term of the Year. It wasn’t too long ago that you couldn’t watch the evening news or visit your favorite online site and not see the term polar vortex. Not only that, but it was usually followed by “and if you think this one is bad (cold) […]

Drought? Tropical Storm? Heat Wave? Pick Your Memory, But Your Next One May Be of Heat

It’s already been pretty hot in the American Southwest, but with the first heat wave east of the Rockies right around the corner, it reminds me that summer — which begins tomorrow — is kicking off as it often does: lots of heat. But I don’t remember it always being that way.

Long-Term U.S. Winter Forecast on Track: Rainy NW, Mild-ish NE, Tepid South

ImpactWeather updates its 30-day outlooks by the 15th of each month. As that was yesterday, YourWeatherBlog asked ImpactWeather’s long-range meteorologist Fred Schmude for his thoughts. The latest long-range data favors a continued elevated (more northerly) flow pattern as we move into February. Additionally, the faster flow pattern will not be on the same scale as […]

Where’s the Snow? Skiers Holding Their Breath…and Their Skis

The current storm track situation — the past couple of weeks, this week and, to a large degree, next week — is making skiers across the country quite frustrated. It’s making those running ski resorts quite frustrated, too. Why? Both fall and early winter have been under the influence of La Niña and a positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation.

Foreshadow: Does Early Snow Equal More Snow More Often?

The buzz in my neighborhood, now that the Halloween candy stockpiles have lost their sparkle, is the coming winter weather. Houston is full of people just like me who are northern transplants down here who miss the snow and the cold, but are happy that — for the most part — a winter on the Gulf Coast is tame and fairly mild. Still, the possibility of snow sets this town in an uproar almost as much as the possibility of the Texans going to the Super Bowl. Could it be possible, because of last weekend’s early and record-breaking snowfall, North America has been primed for an unusually cold and snowy winter?

Texas Continues to Burn, Mostly Out of Control

The out-of-control forest fires are close enough to Houston that we can smell the smoke (Bastrop State Park in the photo below is about 110 miles northwest of Houston). In Magnolia, a nearby and popular escape from urban Houston, thousands of acres have been consumed by fire. In the state’s capital, wildfires have forced thousands […]

Violent Weather La Niña’s Fault? And What About Hurricane Season?

Part II: Yesterday, I talked about the weird weather we’ve been having lately – record tornadoes, record floods, late season snows, late season record lows. What’s going on? Does all this portend of more to come? Does it mean a more active hurricane season? Are there factors leading to the expected active hurricane season which are to blame for all of this unusually active/weird weather? ImpactWeather’s StormWatch Manager Fred Schmude helps shed some light on the situation.

End In Sight For U.S. Drought?

Over the past couple of weeks we’ve been talking a lot about the drought across Texas and other parts of the Southwest. Matter of fact, just yesterday I posted on how the Texas drought was to blame for a wind storm that occurred across the eastern U.S. earlier this week. Is there an end in […]

Tired of the Cold? Are Warmer Days Ahead?

Who isn’t tired of the cold weather because I certainly am! The spring and fall are without a doubt my favorite two seasons and I’m beginning to think that spring can’t get here fast enough (even though this week has been pleasant in Houston). It’s always difficult to know how to dress this time of […]

El Niño Not To Blame (This Time)

It’s cloudy and unusually cold in Houston at this writing. Not exactly the stuff of La Niña, yet eastern Pacific waters are cooler than normal allowing western Pacific waters to be warmer than normal which, in turn, allows abundant precipitation across Equatorial waters of the western Pacific. Translation? Classic La Niña.