“ENOUGH,” Says New England But More Snow is on the Way

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Two emails were waiting in my Inbox this morning. The first was from my cousin who lives between Boston and the coast. She said she wants to move to Texas. The second was from my aunt who lives a couple of houses away from the shore of Lake Winnipesaukee in central New Hampshire. She simply said, “ENOUGH!” Interestingly, she had been asking for snow a few months ago. Another cousin — a skier — in Montpelier, VT can never have too much snow. Maybe this time he’ll be saying, “Enough!” as well.

And there was another email waiting quietly in my Inbox this morning. This one was from our StormWatch team identifying the areas that will receive the heaviest snowfall. Lake Winnipesaukee may see as much as 20 inches, Montpelier just a little less and Boston maybe 6 to 8 inches of snowfall depending on the storm track. Let’s not forget the first full day of spring is this coming Thursday.

Image: ImpactWeather. Click for larger size.

Cold and moisture are not at all limited in this late season scenario that will bring as much as 20 inches of snow to parts of New Hampshire and Vermont, unusual cold from the Plains to the Mid-Atlantic and a chance of severe weather – including a tornado risk – to the Deep South.  But that’s not all: Winds of up to 35 mph from Virginia to North Dakota will cause travel issues as blowing snow restricts visibility and will exacerbate already-high accumulations. Travel delays and interruptions to power and business should be expected. Image: ImpactWeather. Click for larger size.

The pattern is an interesting one, as a look at ImpactWeather’s “Day One” image to the left indicates. Not one, but two low pressure areas are combining to draw abundant moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, abundant moisture from the Atlantic and abundant cold from the northern regions of Canada. Key to all of this is the high-latitude blocking pattern that is at its highest level in many years (blocking patterns can tie-up global weather patterns, but also shove weather systems much farther south — or north — than usual) and is showing no signs of breaking down with the passage of today’s double-barreled low pressure system. In fact, it looks like the block may survive another 10 days which would allow another couple of weather systems, including unseasonable cold, to plunge much farther south than one might expect for this time of year. ImpactWeather’s StormWatch Manager, Fred Schmude, was noting how temperatures in North Dakota and south-central Canada are some 30 degrees below normal. Temperatures in Europe and Russia are much below normal, too.

New England snowfall. Image: ImpactWeather StormWatch

By Wednesday New England snowfall is expected to reach 20 inches in areas of central New Hampshire and Vermont. Image: ImpactWeather StormWatch. Click for larger image

I think my cousin is onto something about moving to Texas. We’re expecting near-record highs today in the middle 80s and today was the first day I’ve worn my summer motorcycle jacket since early November.

A band of ice from Illinois to New England - most areas 1/8 inch or less, but isiaoted totals to 1/4 inch - will be trapped between the rain to the east and south, and the snow to the west and north. Image: ImpactWeather. Click for larger size.

A band of ice from Illinois to New England – most areas 1/8 inch or less, but isolated totals to 1/4 inch – will be trapped between the rain to the east and south, and the snow to the west and north. Image: ImpactWeather. Click for larger size.

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